Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Romantic Era Sleeve Supports Completed

Yesterday I made a great start on making the sleeve puffs/supports for my late 1820s dress project, and I have just completed them this morning.  From looking at the various examples of my research post, I decided to try to re-create the English pair from the Victoria & Albert Museum, London:

c.1830 Victoria & Albert Museum

I was drawn to this pair from the start; I liked the simple shape, and knew that it would be fairly straight forward to reproduce.















I ended up using a lovely and thick Irish linen, which is an ivory colour. As well as the thick fabric helping to hold them up, the wool that I have used to stuff them is cream, and the colour of that would show through a lighter fabric, so it worked well.

The only really tricky thing was deciding where those ties should go. Looking at the image from the V&A, it seems that there are 4 ties on each; one at each corner. So I stitched these on once the whole sleeve support was complete, again I can just about make this out from the image. I then started wondering how they attached, and to what.

As I was thinking this, I remembered that I had seen a sketch of exactly that in one of my books- 'Underwear Fashion in Detail' By Eleri Lynn through Victoria and Albert Publishing, which is below:




Accompanying the drawing is the following text:

''These sleeve pads were held in place with tapes...that were tacked onto the corset''


Right, mystery solved! I think that I will tack the ties onto the stays, but not tie them centre front and back as shown here, as I don't want it to look bulky around the bodice area, but I'll work that one out later.




My sleeve supports

Now I just need to make myself a pair of pantalettes, and all my late 1820s underpinnings are done!  I shan't blog about those, because they are not wonderfully exciting, and are on my shop for those who want to have a look at a pair.

Right, back to my ideas for the 1820s dress- just how do I want the bodice to look?!

with love,
Naomi