Wednesday, 8 February 2017

1830s Embroidered Kid Gloves with Tassels

Now this is a special pair gloves. In the 5 years or so that I have been trading in antique clothing and accessories, I have found only one other pair of pre-1840s gloves:-

Early 1800s Stamped and Embroidered Gloves

So when I saw these I grabbed them!:-

c.1830s Embroidered Gloves with Tassels

These rare gloves are so decorative. The embroidered motif in the middle of the glove is beautifully sewn; amazing work. But look at those tassels! Between them is a small strip of elastic. These strips are backed with the same leather as the gloves, so are original. Then we have beautiful red silk tassels, so pretty.  They are exquisitely hand stitched.


Embroidered Motif detail


Red Silk Tassels


I have been researching gloves, and looking high and low for a pair with tassels, to no end!


I have been very much enjoying 'Dress & Textiles' of the 'Discover Dorset' series, by Rachel Worth. She has a super section about glove making, with much about Yeovil's glove making trade, here in Somerset.:-

 "Employers were exacting and women worked very long hours. There were penalties for 'poor' or 'dirty' work. Before the advent of the sewing machine...most gloving cottages would have had a device known as the 'donkey frame', which had been patented by James Winter of Stoke-Sub-Hamdon (Somerset) in 1807. This was a small, vice like arrangement with fine teeth, mounted on a stand. The worker opened or closed the teeth by means of a treadle, fixing the glove so that the edges were held firmly together. She then passed her needle in and out of the teeth and a perfectly regular stitch resulted. The 'frame' or 'engine' as it was sometimes called enabled workers to produce work of a consistent standard. The number of stitches per inch was usually 18-20, although it could sometimes be as many as 32." 

So that is how they were so perfectly hand stitched!


Naomi x