Antique/Extant Clothing 2


c.1840s Baby's First Shift- -Linen
c.1840s Baby’s First Shift- -Linen

c.1840s Antique Early Victorian Baby’s First Shift Undershirt in Linen

This is delightful. A beautiful early Victorian baby’s shift in fine linen, and no damage that I can see. A superb example of ‘plain sewing’. It is rare to see one this early and in this condition. It must have been lovingly put away and stored for some time.
This little shift has been so carefully made. It has been handsewn, with the tiniest of stitches. It has the side gores running up from the hem, and underarm gores. the sleeves are full and gathered to the shoulders. At the neckline is the flap which falls down at the front and back, over the stays or flannel.
Measurements:
Length from top of shoulder to hem~ 15 2/8″ (38.5cm)
Circumference at hem~ 21 1/2″ (54.5cm)
From underarm gore to underarm gore~ 7 1/2″ (19cm)

1910s Mourning/Black Satin Gown
1910s Mourning/Black Satin Gown
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1910s Black Satin Gown

1910s Mourning Edwardian Gown – Superb Condition – Bust 31″ Waist 23″ – Lace & Passementerie.

This gown is a beautifully decorated 1910s black mourning gown in silk satin.not all black gowns were mourning gowns at this time; simply made black dresses were also worn by servants, and shop staff, for example. But the beauty and the embellishments used here point to a day dress made for a young woman in mourning, possibly a family memeber, WWI or the death of King Edward VII in 1910 perhaps.

It was made by ‘Wm. Robb & Son, Costumiers, Hexham’ – so the label inside reads. Hexham is in Northumberland, England:-
“The store established by itinerant Scottish weaver William Robb in 1818 traded successfully in the town centre for 190 years, into the sixth generation of the Robb family.” (local newspaper)

Construction:-
This gown is made from a lightweight black silk satin. It has a modesty panel of chemical lace. At the high neck we have the same chemical lace, and net ruffles to the very top. There are sweat shields, ‘made in the US’. There are chemical lace motifs to the front bodice and lovely crochet buttons, 3 to each side. There is the sailor style collar to the back, again with the lace motifs. The sleeves have 4 crochet buttons each, and piping, lace motifs and a narrow lace trim. At the back are two tails with beautiful tassels to complete them. The bodice closes with hooks and eyes or bars, and the skirt with poppers.

1890-1900 Parasol
1890-1900 Parasol

Parasol 1890-1900

This late Victorian parasol is black with gold stripes. It closes with a pearl button and metal ring, there is a metal ferrule cap, and a beautiful wooden handle. It is not perfect; there was one split in the canopy almost from one end to the other. I decided to handsew this together again.  There are 3 or 4 other small splits throughout. The tassels are in superb condition.

1829s/1830s Gown
1829s/1830s Gown

c.1830s Antique Regency Romantic Era Dress

This is a wonderful c. late 1820s/early 1830s dress. The neckline shape is perfect for a whiteworked pelerine. It was made for a narrow lady; as you see from the photos it will not do up at the back on my mannequin. It has a lovely ‘V’ shape to the bodice, with a ruffled edging. There is piping throughout the bodice. The hem is 5 1/2″ deep. It has no hooks and eyes to the back. The full skirt is gathered onto a wide waistband all the way around. The bodice is lined in both linen and cotton. The sleeves are straight, and at the cuffs is a ruching feature. They close with large brass hooks and handsewn bars (which look original), and there are elbow pleats. The printed cotton has a light purple and white background, with a darker purple squiggly design on top.
Measurements:-
Waist 24″
Bust 29″
Circumference of skirt 120″

c.1830-1850s Antique Carrickmacross Lace Collar with Needle-Fillings
c.1830-1850s Antique Carrickmacross Lace Collar with Needle-Fillings

c.1830-1850s Antique Carrickmacross Lace Collar with Needle-Fillings 

Carrickmacross lace is made with a machine made net ground, the motifs are cut from muslin or fine linen (cambric), and then applied with tiny chain stitches by hand. It was begun in the 1820s in Ireland, and in the 1840s lace schools were established to make large quantities.

All around the egde of the collar is a two-leaved motif, with 5 smaller leaves trailing off them. There are beautiful needlelace fillings in the centres of the 2 large leaves, and a scalloped eding. It is a little quirky in as much that the centre front edges aren’t quite equal one is 1/2″ shorter than the other.

Measurements:-
Width at centre back~ 7 1/2″ (19cm)
Length along hem~ 25 1/2″ (65cm)
Inside Neck~ 17 3/8″ (44cm)

Edwardian Lace Engageantes Sleeve Ruffles 1900s Net Brussels Muslin Applique
Edwardian Lace Engageantes Sleeve Ruffles 1900s Net Brussels Muslin Applique

Edwardian Lace Engageantes Sleeve Ruffles – Net Brussels Muslin Applique

These net lace engageantes were attached to sleeve hems which finished just above the elbow, adding a beautiful lace flounce.
Construction:
These are a light cream. They were originally gathered along the top to fit onto the bottom of a sleeve. Much of this gathering has come undone. The lace is Brussels muslin appliqué. They are hand sewn.
Measurements:
Width- 7 1/2″ (19cm)
Length- 40″ (102cm)

1850s/1860s Victorian Cotton Broderie Anglaise False Sleeves Engageantes
1850s/1860s Victorian Cotton Broderie Anglaise False Sleeves Engageantes

1850s/1860s Victorian Cotton Broderie Anglaise False Sleeves Engageantes

This pair of false sleeves, or engageantes, are a lovely example from the 1850s or 1860s. They would been used with the wide sleeved fashions of the day, such as the pagoda sleeves. A lady would have tacked them to the inside lining of her bodice sleeves.

Construction:
They are made from white cotton, and are beautifully hand sewn and hand embroidered. A small pearl button does them up at the wrist. They are less fine than some other pairs I have come across, but lovely nonetheless. Each sleeve has ‘A.Grisdale’ written on them in laundry ink. And interestingly, both sleeves have a long rectangle piece of fabric sewn to them, which I can’t quite make out. There is a strip of piping just above the gathers to the wrist, and the buttons fasten with handsewn bars.

Measurements:
Length~ 18″ (45.5cm)
Width at hem~ 17 1/2″ (44.5cm)
Circumference of Cuff~ 6″ (16cm)

1900s/1910s Edwardian Shirtwaist or Blouse - Sleeveless Sheer Linen
1900s/1910s Edwardian Shirtwaist or Blouse – Sleeveless Sheer Linen

1900s/1910s Edwardian Shirtwaist or Blouse – Sleeveless Sheer Linen with Tucks and Crochet Motifs. Waist 22-25″

This sleeveless linen blouse is a truly lovely example of early 1900s fashion, with a standing collar and Irish crochet work motifs.
This beautiful waist has been entirely handsewn. The lightweight, sheer linen is very fine, almost handkerchief linen. It would be ideal during the summer months. There is a standing collar with very pretty asymmetrical flower and stem motifs. A narrow piece of lace runs along the top. To the inside of the collar are 3 wire supports. (These are covered with fine thread, but on 2 of the supports some of the thread is missing.) This section of the blouse closes with 4 metal hooks and corresponding handsewn loops. The back of the shirtwaist is plain, and closes with 3 tiny mother of pearl buttons. To the front there are 10 vertical tucks to each side, radiating down from the shoulders. Then there are 3 lovely Irish crochet motifs, and embroidered flowers.

Measurements:
{Please note that shirtwaists or waists were designed to be worn loosely. That was the fashion of the time.}
Bust~ 32-34” (81.3-86.4cm)
Waist~ 22-25″ (56-63.5cm)
From Shoulder to hem~ 19 1/2” (49.5cm)


Early 1900s Edwardian Lingerie Dress
Early 1900s Edwardian Lingerie Dress

1900s Edwardian Lingerie Dress Bust 34” Waist 28”

This sheer white cotton lingerie dress is in superb, ready to wear condition. It has been restored and cleaned. It dates to around the early 1900s, when the fashion for the white lingerie dresses first appeared, and the fashion for the poofy waist area was in vogue. You will need a slip to go under this, and a gorgeous, wide hat of course!

Construction:
This cotton muslin dress has been made mostly by machine, but there is also a fair amount of hand stitching. It closes down the back with 22 hooks and handsewn bars. The sleeves are 3/4 length, and are finished with a wide embroidered cutwork trim, which can also be seen under the arms. To the bodice there is a lovely delicate lace insertion going up to the neck, and then there are sections of embroidered trim and delicate tucks. Below that is a gathered section, which creates the poofy bit which hangs above the waist. The skirt section of the dress features rectangles interspersed with a narrow, ladderwork style trim. Towards the hem there is a gorgeous, wide embroidered cutwork section, then the narrowest of tucks, then another panel of whitework trim, then more tucks. Very beautiful!

It seems that some of the seams have been finished on the inside, and some have been left raw.

Measurements:
Bust~ 34” (86cm)
Waist~ 28” (71cm)
Hips~ 38” (96cm)
From Shoulder to hem~ 54” (137cm)
Circumference of hem~ 90” (228cm)
Circumference of sleeve~ 12” (30cm)

Early 20th Century Reform Corset
Early 20th Century Reform Corset

Reform Corset in Twill with Bone Buttons

This corset is very similar to a ‘Reform’ or ‘Hygienic’ corset by Jaeger in the V&A, Museum no.T.229-1968, c.1890. I think this corset is a bit later than that, well into the 1900s. Corsets with this shape were being produced into the 1950s. Inside are 2 maker’s labels, ‘Froja Korsett’ and ‘Hygienisk Halso Korsett’, so I think this comes from Sweden.
We can see the features of reform corsets here; the pleated soft bust cups, the shoulder straps with buttons, the softer fabric, and the small amount of boning. The fabric is jean, with the herringbone weave. There is one piece of metal boning at each side, then at the centre back, 2 pieces, one either side of the metal eyelets, and then one to the edge of the buttons. The 10 buttons down the front are bone, but those at the shoulder straps look like plastic. Around the top is a pretty machine embroidered trim. It is all machine made. The colour is an usual mucky ecru but with a green tinge!

Edwardian Blouse with Handmade Buttons
Edwardian Blouse with Handmade Buttons

Edwardian Blouse or Shirtwaist- with Tucks, Lace and Handmade Buttons

This white cotton blouse is a mixture of hand and machine sewing. It fastens down the back with 9 small mother of pearl buttons. It has a delicate high neck made of 3 rows of lace. The yoke is made of embroidered cotton. To the front down one side of this there are 3 small handmade thread buttons which sit on a vertical twisted strip of fine lace. To the edge of the bodice yoke there is a section of insertion lace.
The sleeves are also profusely decorated with embroidered cotton fabric insertions, and again are edged with lace. The sleeve hems are finished with a gathered lace frill. Down both the front and the back are very fine vertical tucks. To the back the blouse has been tightly gathered at the waist and sewn onto a cotton tape strip. Cotton tape ties are brought around the front from the back, and are tied in the middle. There is excess fabric at the front of the blouse, which is meant to fall over the front waist, in the fashion of the early 1900s. The sleeves are 3/4 length, finishing midway up the forearm.

1800-1830 Regency Linen Men's Under-Drawers
1800-1830 Regency Linen Men’s Under-Drawers

c.1800s to 1830s Regency Georgian Gentlemen’s Linen Drawers with Dorset Buttons

What a fascinating find! We are used to seeing Georgian/Regency men’s drawers/under breeches which were the shorter version, with strings at the sides, little changed for many decades. But by the early 1800s, the fashion for long, tight trousers or britches/breeches began. (Beau Brummell had much to do with that, of course.) And so men needed longer, more closely fitting underwear; hence the new style of these drawers – long in the leg, with buttons at the ankles to accommodate getting your foot through whilst having a close fitting ankle under the slim trousers.
These are made with an off-white glazed linen; it is slightly shiny. There are 6 Dorset buttons to the front, and one smaller sized button to each ankle. The hems are gathered onto ultra fine linen frills. To the front, under the wide waistband there are 5 pleats to each side. At some point in its life the drawers’ buttons were moved to bring the waist in. There is evidence of where the buttons were originally sewn, and the front is slightly off centre because of this. To the top of the waistband are 4 button holes (2 at the front, 2 to the back). Perhaps the button holes attached to buttons inside a shirt or another item of clothing.
Measurements:
Waist~ originally these were 26/27″. With the buttons moved they are 25″.
From top of waistband to hem of frills~ 41″

1860s 1870s Chemise & Drawers Set
1860s 1870s Chemise & Drawers Set

1860s 1870s Set of Chemise & Drawers

These two items of Victorian underpinnings are interesting for a few reasons. Firstly, you rarely find a matching pair together, and secondly, the decoration with the red under the embroidery is very unusual, not to mention very pretty! They are beautifully hand sewn. Both items have the laundry label of “Marie Fitch”. On the chemise it is written at the hem, and along the waistband of the drawers.
The chemise has the type of sleeve which we would expect to see of this era; the underarm gore shaping and gathering at the top of the sleeve. At the neckline and sleeve hems there is narrow whitework/broderie anglaise trim, and then below that strips of red twill cotton with white embroidery. At the bodice front there is a large triangle shape section of whitework bordered with the same red and embroidery trim.
The open drawers at this time are longer than during later parts of the Victorian era. They are gathered onto a wide waistband, and there is a small section at the back with a drawstring, to be able to adjust the size. The hems of the legs are again beautifully decorated. At the very bottom there is a wide whitework trim, then a strip of the red and white embroidery trim, then above that a strip of whitework trim has been laid over the red twill fabric, giving a lovely effect.

1870s Dressing Sacque
1870s Dressing Sacque

1870s Victorian Dressing Sacque Jacket En Deshabille

There is a mixture of machine and hand stitching here. It is made from a lightweight cotton. The wonderful whitework trim is all handsewn. The button holes are handsewn. At the base of the jacket are 4 horizontal rows of tucks. It fastens with 4 small linen buttons behind the placket. There are pleats that start at the top of the neckline at the back, leaving room for the bustle at the back of the lady’s outfit. Length~ 28” (71 cm) from neck to hem at the back

1830s Pelerine Collar
1830s Pelerine Collar

1830s Pelerine Collar with Exquisite Whitework Embroidery – Needlepoint Fillings

This collar is made with an opaque cotton fabric, so different from the lighter, muslin pelerines we often see in this period. It has the ‘boteh’ or paisley motif (so popular from the Regency period, to the mid Victorian era) running a little way inside the edge, with intricate sprays of different needlework fillings. The edge has a scalloped shaping, with flowers and there is a row of wonderful circles with the same superb needlepoint fillings. Quite a piece of art.
It fastens centre front with a handsewn loop and tiny cloth button.
Measurements:
Centre Front~ 9 1/2″ (24cm)
Cente Back~ 11″ (28cm)

Child's Regency Chemisette
Child’s Regency Chemisette

Regency Young Girl’s Muslin Chemisette c.1800-1820s

This is the first child’s chemisette that I have come across. It is too lovely! Made around 1800-1820s.

Construction:
The fabric is a fine muslin. It has shoulder seams, and a more robust front button hem than you find on ladies’ chemisettes. The whitework is beautiful, with tiny ears of wheat adorning the neckline. It closes with 2 tiny ceramic buttons. The neckline shape is square.

Measurements:
From Centre Back to Hem~ 9 1/2″ or 24.5cm
Width at Widest (shoulder to shoulder)~ 13 1/2″ or 43.5cm


1790s 1800s Regency Muslin Tamboured Apron
1790s 1800s Regency Muslin Tamboured Apron

Regency Apron – Muslin Tamboured – 1790s/Early 1800s

This Regency apron is quite a find! There are a fair few clues that point us to the early Regency period. Firstly the tambour work. This was very popular in the early Regency (the ‘sprigged muslins’ that we all know so well were sprigs of flower motifs often in tambour work), and during the last quarter of the 18th. The delicate, well spaced out motif on the apron reminds me of the Regency muslin tamboured dresses (and the apron fabric is certainly muslin). The length and shape also point to the early 19th century- it is 100cm long, quite long for an apron- so perfect for the high waistline of the period. In my opinion, it is most likely that the fabric came from a 1790s dress, which was then re-purposed and was made into an apron. The silk ties added at both ends of the waistband, and the centre join down the middle of the apron show that this is certainly an item that had been pieced together from some other article of dress or textile.

Tambour work was introduced to Europe around 1760. The embroidery is applied with a small hook, creating a chain stitch effect on the top side, and leaves a small series of straight stitches on the reverse.

1830s Workbag or Reticule
1830s Workbag or Reticule

1830s Reticule Purse or Small Bag – Wool Embroidered onto Canvas with Beads

This lovely little purse does have some wear to it, but is a beautiful piece of early Victorian needlework nonetheless. It originally had a silk lining, but sadly nearly all of that has disintegrated, apart from a little along the inside top edges. There is a narrow wooden rod along each top edge, presumably to help the purse keep its shape. Around the edges is a narrow dark red piping or cord. There is the same type of cord for the handles. Both sides of the purse are embroidered with beautifully variegated wool thread, in greens and pinks, and then the flower head motifs are pale blue, and purple. In the centre of each flower is a tiny metal bead. Gold or yellow cotton thread is also used. There is no eveidence of there having been any clasp to keep the purse closed.
Measurements:
Length~ 4 7/8″ or 12.5cm
Width~ 6 1/2″ or 16.5cm

1860s Victorian Shirtwaist
1860s Victorian Shirtwaist

1860s Victorian Shirtwaist Blouse Shirt in dotted White Muslin with Valenciennes Lace

This beautiful 1860s white cotton spotted muslin and lace blouse or shirt is in amazing condition. It is a classic 1860s shirt, with a simple shape, shoulder sleeves a little past the natural line (many had seams halfway down the arm), and is short; sitting just above the natural waistline.  This blouse is beautifully hand sewn. It fastens with a brass hook and eye at the very top of the neck, then behind the lace panel at the front there are 2 tiny pearl buttons (which don’t match), which fasten with hand sewn bars. There are then another 2 hooks and eyes at the waist. The shoulder and sleeve seams are piped. There are 2 types of trim at the neck, sleeve hems and down the front; a row of narrow Valenciennes lace on either side of a delicate strip of whitework trim. The fabric is a fine white cotton muslin with tiny dots.

Late 1830s to 1840s Chemisette
Late 1830s to 1840s Chemisette

Late 1830s Early 1840s Chemisette

This fine muslin chemisette has a Valenciennes lace trim to the neckline, and beautiful whitework embroidery down each front and around the neck. There is also a line of openwork, which again can be seen in the emboridery design. It is off-white in colour, due to its age. It is cut from one piece of fabric, there are no shoulder seams.

Early 1800s Day Cap
1800s to 1830s Day Cap

1800-1830 Regency Georgian Cap – Lace and Embroidered Gauze – Cream – Silk Drawstring

The embroidered or tamboured gauze fabric and the shape of the cap remind me of the later 1700s. Certainly the fabric is identical to that used for 1790s and into the 1800s gowns. It is in such super condition! It looks as though it has hardly been handled. The only other period in time which the shape might fit would be the mid 1800s. But to me the fabric and the lace doesn’t fit. The fabric by that time would be way out of fashion. The lace along the edges of the front and continuing down the lappets is a handmade lace, and very fine. Now the colour- it is a cream. The fabric is much lighter, and that would have been white originally. So it could be that the lace was once white also, and has just coloured with time. The silk drawstring to tie under the hair at the back is a gold colour silk. Maybe the whole cap was dyed at some point?
Caps are one of the more difficult items of historical dress to date as there were so many styles, designs and fabrics/lace.

The crown is made to sit very far back on the head, and is for a small volume of hair, which is why it reminds me of those caps in the 1700s which sat high up on a lady’s head. There is a deep ruffled brim, which again is seen on caps of that era, and the lovely lappets would have sat on the shoulders, and there are also handsewn bars mid way down each lappet to be able to pin them back further up the crown and out of the way.

This stunning cap is entirely handsewn. The drawstring running through the casing at the back is silk. The fabric is a gauze, with embroidered small flower motifs throughout. The crown is gathered onto the front brim. The ruffles and lappets are one piece of fabric. The cap is a CREAM colour, not a bright white as it looks in the photos.

Edwardian Boned Bust Bodice
Edwardian Boned Bust Bodice

Edwardian Boned Bust Bodice Camisole Late 1890s Early 1900s

These structural and often boned bust improvers were used to create the ‘mono bosom’ or ‘pouter pigeon’ look of the late 19th and early 20th century. They were worn over the corset.

Construction:
This white cotton bust bodice has 5 narrow pieces of boning to the front, and a metal eye on tape to attach it to the lady’s corset. There is an extra layer of fabric under the arm area, and Broderie Anglaise trim decorates the neckline and armholes. It fastens at the back with one what looks like bone button at the top, and ties at the bottom.

Edwardian Corset Cover
Edwardian Corset Cover

Early 1900s Edwardian Camisole Embroidered Corset Cover

This white cotton camisole is machine sewn apart from the buttonholes. It has a deep ‘V’ neckline to the front, a shallower one to the back. On both the front and back is this very pretty Broderie Anglaise style of decoration, and the armholes have a narrow ladderwork insertion and a scalloped edge. It crosses over in front, and has a small cloth button to each side.
On the inside can be seen the maker’s label, which reads ‘Sweet Lavender’ REG’D and SLR. I am not sure what this means, have tried to find out a bit more, but to no avail.
Measurements:
Bust~ max 32″ (81cm)
Waist~ max 22″ (56cm)
From Shoulder to Hem~ 15” (38cm)
Circumference of armholes~ 16″ (41cm)

Early to mid 1820s Pelerine Muslin Collar
Early to mid 1820s Pelerine Muslin Collar

Early to Mid 1820s Antique Embroidered Net and Lace Collar Pelerine

This early to mid 1820s extended Regency muslin collar or pelerine is a stunning example of early nineteenth century whitework embroidery. The edge is embroidered into tiny scallops, and on the inside on the collar a beautiful flowers and leaves rolling motif.
Measurements:
Width from inside edge to outside edge (at centre middle)~ 7″ (18cm)
Width from one side to the other~ 24 2/8″ (62cm)

Late 1830s Eraly 1840s Collar
Late 1830s Early 1840s Collar

Late 1830s Early 1840s Antique Muslin Collar

By the late 1830s collars start to diminish in size. The much smaller sleeves needed smaller collars and decoration. I was so pleased to come across this as it is the first of this era that I have seen. The whitework embroidery is very elaborate; we have a beautiful ‘leaves’ theme with this collar, with 4 different styles of leaf.
This is a fine white cotton muslin collar with embroidered whitework. It is entirely hand stitched. This is one of the more highly decorative collars that I have seen, which is indicative of the whitework collars/chemisettes/fichus of the 1830s and into the 1840s. There are 4 different styles of leaves in the motif. The needlework fillings in the centre of each main motif are so delicate. There may originially have been a lace trim sewn to the outer edge.
Measurements:
Width from inside edge to outside edge (at centre middle)~ 4 7/8″ (12cm)
Width from one side to the other~ just shy of 15″ (38cm)

Oktis Corset Shields c.1900
Oktis Corset Shields c.1900

Oktis Corset Shields c.1900 Waist 24″. Complete with Packaging & Leaflet

Oktis shields were sewn into a corset to help prolong its life. The example here is from the early 1900s, and the ‘S’ bend or monobosom shape is clearly recognisable in the illustrations. What is so wonderful here is that the original packaging is still intact, and so comes with a brown narrow envelope, and the instructions/information leaflet. The corset shields themselves are in mint condition, I can’t see any marks. The waist size is 24″. Quite remarkable!

“Doubles the life of a corset. Prevents breaking on hips. Improves the fit of a Dress. Transforms old corsets into new.”


1840s 1850s Day Cap
1840s 1850s Day Cap

Mid Victorian 1840s-60s Cream Cap

This is made in a fine checkered muslin with an interesting design. Surrounding the cap are beautifully scalloped, embroidered ruffles, which must have taken some considerable time to sew. There is piping at the join between the ruffles and the front of the cap, and along the edge of the crown at the back. Along the edge of the cap there is a row of feather stitch embroidery, and this is again seen a couple of inches away from the ruffles around the face. There are flat rectangular ties.
This is a small cap, so will fit a small head, and will not cover all the hair. The shapes and styles of caps were very plentiful during the 19th century; they didn’t all cover the entire head. This is a lovely genteel cap, worn for its decoration, and not to work in!

1820s/30s Wrapper/Peignoir
1820s/30s Wrapper/Peignoir

Late 1820s Early 1830s Peignoir/Wrapper

The condition of this wrapper is incredible for its age. It can’t have been worn very much at all as there is not a single antique repair. There are a couple of holes and one or two tiny marks, but that’s it. The Dorset Bandford buttons at the wrists are also in superb condition. Quite remarkable.

”Dressing gowns or wrappers were made of cotton, linen or flannel…Surviving examples tend to be suitable for wearing inside bedrooms or boudoirs over underwear but before putting on a dress and they could be worn as negligees for comfort when the corset was not worn.”  The Rise and Fall of the Sleeve 1825-1840 Naomi Tarrant – Royal Scottish Museum Studies. 1983

It is made from a light to medium weight twilled cotton, with a finer cotton used for all those fabulous frills everywhere. There is also a ruching effect in between the body of the wrapper and the frills. The photos below show the fabric texture.

There are two wide pelerine style collars, a pair of ties at the neckline, and there is a drawstring casing which pulls in the gathers at the high waist area at the rear and ties at in the front.
Measurements:-
CB to hem 54” / 137 cm
Hem Circumference 115” / 292 cm
Length of Sleeve from shoulder gathers to hem of ruffle 32” / 81 cm

Details of 1820s/30s Wrapper
Early 19th Century Boudoir Jacket
Early 19th Century Boudoir or Undress Jacket

Early 1800s Boudoir /Undress Jacket

A jacket such as this would have been worn as ‘early morning’ or ‘undress’ attire, when one would possibly write letters and instruct servants, and possibly see only members of their own family. It is very roomy, there is no tape inside to create shape. It is very simply made. The falling collar is made from a rectangle of fabric, and one end has been pieced together. The flounces of the collar and the sleeves are made from very fine linen, and the cuffs are made with a firmer linen. The rest of the jacket is a light cotton. There are 2 tucks at the very bottom of the flounces on the cuffs, and there are tabs for buttons which you can see below, but sadly no buttons (I am sure though that these would have been Dorset Blandfords). To fasten at the neck there is simply one set of ties.

There are no under arm gores, and the body of the jacket looks like rectangular pieces of fabric which are gathered at the neckline, very little if any shaping.

1840s Fine Linen Cap
1840s Fine Linen Cap

1840s Victorian Fine Linen Cap with Cording and Bucks Lace

This cap has double flounces to frame the face, and a single flounce to the back. At the edges we have a beautiful Bucks lace. This lace has also been added to the bottom of the ties.
The forms of decoration used are-
*very narrow cording (1 section)
*padded satin stitch embroidery whitework (3 sections)
*fine ladderwork to embroidered sections
*Buckinghamshire Lace (to flounces and ties)
The main body of the cap is a fine, handkerchief quality linen. The flounces around the cap are a fine cotton, looks like lawn to me. On the inside, at the back a drawstring casing is there, but with only one piece of narrow cord, to bring the cap in under the hair. In the high crown at the back is a section of gathered linen. This is a large cap, and is made to cover most of the head.

Early to mid 1820s White Muslin Collar
Early to mid 1820s White Muslin Collar

Early to Mid 1820s Muslin Collar Pelerine with Exquisite Whitework

This early to mid 1820s extended Regency collar or pelerine is a stunning example of early nineteenth century whitework embroidery.
Measurements:
Width from inside edge to outside edge (at centre middle)~ 4 1/2″ (11.5cm)
Width from one side to the other~ 24″ (61.5cm)

1850s/60s Petticoat altered into later style
1850s/60s Petticoat altered into later style

1850s 1860s Petticoat Altered into Later Style

The hand sewn whitework on this petticoat is simply breathtaking. Difficult to comprehend such work was seen only by the wearer themselves and their maid or dressing aid. Whitework embroidery like this was everywhere during this period, (in the 1850s/60s). It was on cuffs, sleeves, fichus, children’s wear.

This white cotton petticoat’s origins are back in the 1850s/60s. It would have been worn over a huge crinoline hooped cage. At a later date a section of that pettiocat has been taken and made into a different style of petticoat. Above the whitework, which covers just over half of the pettiocat, I can see the traces of where original tucks have been unpicked. So the later petticoat is machine sewn, although the incredibly fine cartridge pleats have been hand sewn to the waistband. The waistband closes with a brass hook and eye. The whitework motifs are intricate leaves and flower heads.