Antique/Extant Clothing 3



Details Linen Chemisette
Details Linen Chemisette

Regency Linen Chemisette
Regency Linen Chemisette

Early 1800s Linen Regency Chemisette with Ceramic Button 

This Regency women’s chemisette is a super example of Regency fashion, in wonderful condition. It is a lovely crisp white, with some very light staining (I don’t think my camera has even picked it up) to the front left panel. It has a delicate, narrow ruffled collar, with the tiniest (6mm) of ceramic buttons. Beautiful, fine stitching. We can see the economy of the Regency lady who sewed it, with a small triangle of fabric to the front and back, one to each shoulder. This ‘piecing’ would not be seen, and every scrap of fabric to be used has been. Tape ties to the back panel pass through the casing at the 2 fronts, to be tied in the middle. This is a small size.

Measurements :- 

Bust is around 32″. Neck is 13″. From Shoulder Seam to Hem 12 1/2″.


1780s Muslin Embroidered Apron
1780s Muslin Embroidered Apron

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Condition Photos of 18th Century Apron 
Details of 1780s Muslin Apron
Details of 1780s Muslin Apron

c.1780s Muslin Embroidered Apron

This gorgeous late 18th century muslin apron is in superb condition. It is a fabulous historical dress specimen; we have a turned over top edge with linen tape running through it, it is as we would expect shorter along the centre front than the 2 sides, there is a bobbin lace trim all around the edge, and the chain-stitch embroidery has a wonderful selection of needlework fillings.

Condition:- As stated above it is almost perfect. There are 3 small marks, and one antique darn (which is very hard to find). It has been well cared for in the past, and is a gentle white colour. Please see further photos below.

Measurements:- Length of Sides ~ 39 1/2″.  Centre Front ~ 37″. Width along Bottom ~ 48″.




Bodice of early 1890s Outfit
Bodice of early 1890s Outfit














Early 1890s Ensemble

This is a beautiful example of early 1890s fashion. I was very fortunate that it came with the satin belt which attaches the skirt to the bodice, as it so easily could have been lost.  The stitching inside is both hand and machine stitching.

It is made with a light brown wool twill, and has applied trim (a form of velvet?) over both the bodice and down the front of the skirt. There is also delicate, tiny chain stitch embroidery amongst the trim, stitched directly onto the fabric. The skirt is a simple shape- straight front, and gathered behind. (It would have looked different on a woman, with the petticoat(s) underneath it.) It is lined in cotton. There is no train. Hooks and bars attach the back of the bodice to the back of the skirt waistband (which is a piece of strong cotton tape). There is a pocket in the gathers at the back of the skirt, and a watch pocket high up in the bodice (see photos below). The bodice has a faux plastron lace panel, and a high collar. It is boned, and numerous hooks and eyes fasten the body tightly into it. The sleeves are long at 26″, and finish in a lovely point with a brown delicate gathered fabric trim.  The applied trim features at the top of the head of the sleeve.

A note about the ribbon sash- there was evidence of stitching along the skirt waistband and at the bottom of the bodice. I have guessed that the bow was at the front, but it may well have been at the back. The bow had a large hook sewn onto it, but sadly I could not find any corresponding bar or hook anywhere. (Since photographing this, I have seen many similar ensembles with a bow at the back.)

The bodice is lined in a striped cotton. There are 11 bones, and sewn in at the underarms are 2 protectors (American made).  There was originally a silk backing to the lace at the middle and on the high collar, but this has all but shattered now.

Early 1890s Day Outfit
Early 1890s Day Outfit
1820s 1830s Lace Cuffs with Dorset Buttons
1820s 1830s Lace Cuffs with Dorset Buttons

1820s 1830s Lace Cuffs with Dorset Buttons

Here are a pair of beautiful 1820s/30s lace cuffs. They are formed of 3 sections, the top which is a piece of net doubled over, then the middle section which is embroidered net lace with the same honeycomb net as the top, and then the lower section, which is on a diamond net ground. The hand stitched Dorset Blandford buttons fasten with stitched bars. They will fit a wrist of 6 1/2”.

They have the tiniest Dorset buttons I have ever seen, a mere 1/4” or 7mm. There is some evidence of them being sewn to the long sleeves which these would have been worn with. There are a couple of holes along the top third of the cuffs, and there are a couple of pieces of thread. But this is simple conjecture here.

They are in very good condition for their age, but on one cuff there are a few issues. One of the buttons does not match the other 3. It has been replaced at some point with a ‘Singleton’ style of button. The other button on the cuff has sadly been damaged and bent. I can only guess that this was the cuff sewn to the sleeve of the hand of the writer maybe, or perhaps that one was damaged during washing?

Date wise, I was thinking the 1830s, (due to my knowledge of fashion rather than anything else. I am trying to learn about lace, but don’t find it easy). By the late 1820s and into the 1830s, long sleeves finished at the wrist rather than much further down over the hands as they often used to during the Regency period. And as pelerines, wide canezous/fichus came into their own in the latter half of the 1820s, lace and whiteworked cuffs were a beautiful accompaniment. Some were worn at the base of the sleeve with the lace cuff poking out, and larger ones were folded right back over the sleeve hem.  See-  White-embroidered costume accessories: the 1790s to 1840s – Heather Toomer and Elspeth Reed

1910s 1920s Wrap Around Bust Bodice
1910s 1920s Wrap Around Bust Bodice

1910s 1920s Restored Antique Edwardian Wrap-around Bust Bodice or Brassiere Large Size

During the early 20th century some women were wearing corsets that contained the torso and hips, (creating a slender silhouette) but not the breasts. This brought about the fashion for ‘bust bodices’ or ‘brassieres’, which covered the bust area, and were worn over the chemise and corset. The word ‘brassiere’ first came into use in America in 1907, and then in England by 1912.
Construction:
This white wrap around brassiere is made from a thick cotton. It has 3 pearl buttons down the front, and crossover ties which go through loops at the sides and then are tied together at the back. The neckline and armholes have a pretty ribbon whitework trim. At the front are seams or channels , 3 to each side. I don’t know if these had boning in at some time.

1840s Victorian Fichu-Canezou
1840s Victorian Fichu-Canezou

1840s Victorian Organdy Fichu-Canezou

This early Victorian fichu canezou is unusual; I haven’t come across many of these. This style of accessory is seen during the 1840s. They were worn over gowns, and held in place with pins and brooches. The shape of it matches the ‘V’ shape of bodices at that time. The fabric feels like organdy- it is quite stiff. It may not be, of course.
It is quite simple in design and decoration. The three forms of decoration used are-
*Ladderwork
*Padded Satin Stitch Embroidery in a Leaves motif
*Bobbin net lace. Possibly Buckinghamshire Point lace?

Measurements:
From top of collar to back hem- 16 1/2”
Circumference of Collar- 13 1/2”

Early 19th Century Nightgown
Early 19th Century Nightgown

Early 19th Century Nightgown

This large linen nightgown is so beautifully made. It is quite quirky however.

It has the features that I would expect to see on an early 19th century nightgown- side gores, underarm gores, ruffles all down the front, and ruffles at the sleeve cuffs. The collar is very similar to that of the boudoir jacket above, and there are 3 pairs of ties down the front. One of the cuffs has the original Dorset Blandford button, but sadly the other cuff has a later plain linen Victorian replacement.

There are other features which are unusual. There are pleats at the top, which seem to be part of the original nightgown. They finish halfway down the ruffles. There are 5 button holes down one side, but there are no buttons on the other side, and no evidence of there ever having been any. The button holes don’t line up with the ties.

Measurements:- Length- 54″  Circumference at Hem- 84″

Detail of Early 19th Century Bedgown
Detail of Early 19th Century Bedgown
1830s Embroidered Kid Gloves
1800 – 1830s Embroidered Kid Gloves

1800 – 1830s Embroidered and Stamped Kid Gloves

I know very little about gloves, but what caught my eye when I first saw these was the pinking/stamping designs at the hems and the embroidered pattern over the back of the hands. The embroidery thread is some form of metallic thread, it is very narrow, and feels like a fine wire. They are stitched on the outside, with the minutest of stitches. These are in remarkably good condition for their age. One antique darn can be seen in the photos. The pinked hems do have some damage; one of the tips has been torn away, and there are other small tears in the stamp work. Some of the leather has worn away in very small areas, and there are marks here and there, and of course they are a bit grubby!

Dimensions:-

Length (from tip of pinked triangle to tip of longest finger~ 13 6/8” (35cms). These finish half way up my forearm.

Day gloves, and mittens, equally popular in the 1830s and the 1840s, were wrist length or slightly longer. The decoration on both day and evening gloves, and the fashionable materials were similar: light-coloured leather…Silk or metal thread embroidery of flowers either formed a concentrated design on the back of the hand or were scattered in springs over the whole back of the glove…Evening gloves often had scalloped edges if made of leather…  Gloves Valerie Cummings in The Costume Accessories Series

From studying this book it seems that my gloves must be embroidered with the silver thread. It is now a very dark grey in colour.

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Late 1820s 1830s Muslin Pelerine Collar

This wonderful late 1820s and 1830s pelerine would have matched the wide sleeves of the period. It is made from a fine muslin, with incredible Ayrshire embroidery. It is a light cream in colour.

Measurements:
Width from inside edge to outside edge~ 11 1/2” (29cm) at widest point

Late 1830s Chemisette
Late 1830s Chemisette

Late 1830s Chemisette with Lille Bobbin Lace trim

Needless to say that it is all hand sewn with tiny, tiny stitches. It is made from a fine cotton, and has whitework on the wide collar, and lace edging. The lace is French ‘Lille’ lace, (very similar to Bucks lace), which was extremely popular at the turn of the 19th century. The front 2 sides are interesting as they are not the same length. I expect that one side was torn at some point, and was shortened to remove the holes!

Measurements:
From back of neck to hem~ 11 1/2″
Width of collar from neck to bottom of lace~ 5 1/2″

1830s/1840s Chemisette or Tucker
1830s/1840s Chemisette or Tucker
Late 1830s Early 1840s Chemisette
Late 1830s Early 1840s Chemisette

Late 1830s Early 1840s Chemisette

The chemisette has a high collar, with an embroidered and drawn thread trim section, then ruffles above that. The tucks down the front are actually woven into the fabric; a feature that I have not come across before. It fastens with 2 tiny pearl buttons down the front. It has button holes on both sides, which seems a little unusual, but I have seen 2 early 1800s chemisettes in one of my books with exactly the same feature.
The back at the bottom has been folded over to shorten at some time. There are ties running through the hem of the back piece, which come over the front of the chemisette to tie.

Measurements:
From top of collar to back hem- 14 2/8” (36cm)
Circumference of Collar- 16” (41cm)

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Mid 1820s Embroidery on Net Collar

This mid 1820s to early 1830s net collar is in remarkable condition, it looks barely used. It is decorated with padded satin stitch embroidery. It has 7 large flower motifs, and is scalloped edged with a small flower motif.

Measurements:
Width from inside edge to outside edge~ 7 1/2″ (19cm)
Width from one side to the other~ 21″ (53cm)

1860s/70s Nightgown
1860s/70s Nightgown

1860s/1870s Cotton Nightgown

I did wonder if this was a gentleman’s nightgown, but the sleeve and wrist measurements contradict that theory. Many clues point to the 1860s/70s. There are the underarm gores, and gathering at the top of the sleeve area. Also there are the triangular gores at either side of the collar. At the edge of both the collar and cuffs, and down the placket at the front, are gathered narrow frills made from a lighter and finer fabric. Needless to say that it is all minutely hand sewn.

There were just 2 buttons down the front, but one is missing. The cuffs each have a button. The buttons that are there are linen. They may or may not be replacements. At the back of the nightdress I can see that a large piece of cotton has been added right across from left to right, covering 2/3 of the back of it. Just to the left of the bottom of the placket at the front of the nightgown there is a faint name and 3 numbers underneath, but I can’t quite read it. The nightdress has many antique darns to it.

1890s 'Bolero' Corset Cover
1890s ‘Bolero’ Corset Cover

1890s ‘Bolero’ Corset Cover

On page 27 of “Butterick’s 1892 Mertropolitan Fashions” (Dover reprint – 1994), you will see an advert for a pattern:-

No.4587.- Ladies’ Bolero Corset-Cover. The engravings picture a corset-cover developed in nainsook, with embroidered edging for decoration.

{Nainsook is a type of cotton muslin.}

There are 3 different views/styles of corset cover above the text, almost exactly like this one. My one here didn’t have anything to join the two pieces at the centre, so I have simply threaded through a piece of cotton ribbon. It is mostly hand sewn, although there is a very delicate narrow piece of embroidered trim just above the lace which has been machine stitched on.

1910s 1920s Bust Bodice or Brassiere
1910s 1920s Bust Bodice or Brassiere/Bandeau

1910s 1920s Wrap-around Bust Bodice or Brassiere in Crochet Lace

This is a white wrap around bust bodice made from a style of cotton crochet lace. It wraps around the body with a cotton tape. The shoulder straps are of ribbon. The metal hook was attached to a corset or girdle to stop it from shifting about. The wrap around feature would have helped to reduce the breasts, as was the fashion at this time.

Mid Nineteenth Century Corset Cover
Mid Nineteenth Century Corset Cover

1850s 1860s Victorian Corset Cover

This mid Victorian corset cover is one of the more interesting ones that I have come across. It has a ‘bateau’ shape to the neckline, so most likely would have been worn under an evening bodice or gown, when shoulders and neckline were exposed. It is entirely hand sewn. There are 2 darts to the front, keeping it tight fitting against the lady’s corset. The armholes and neckline have an edge of piping, then beautifully hand sewn cut work. It fastens at the front with 4 cloth buttons.

Measurements:-
Bust~ 32″ (81cm)
Waist~ 23″ (59cm)
Circumference of Sleeve Cuff~ 13″ (33cm)
From Shoulder to Hem~ 14″ (35.5cm)

Legs of Drawers dated 1851
Legs of Drawers dated 1851
Mid 19th Century Drawers
Mid 19th Century Drawers

Dated 1851 – Victorian Drawers

These mid 19th century drawers have been beautifully hand sewn. They have a wide waistband, and secure with one large linen button to the rear. The legs are very long, and there are 12 rows of pin tucks to their hems, with a gorgeous row of hand sewn white work. At the back waistband, there is a name which is very faint, and ‘1851’ (I think it is a ‘5’, but could be a ‘6’) directly underneath. A few of the tucks have come unstitched.

Measurements:-
Waistband~ 26″ (66cm)
Length~ 37 1/2″ (95cm)

Early 1890s Evening Ensemble
Early 1890s Evening Ensemble

Early 1890s Victorian Evening Ensemble

The bodice is a pretty pale gold satin, with an overlay of black lace, and gathered muslin (which is in a very delicate state) along the top of the neckline. It is lined in pale gold silk, which has shattered in most places. It has 11 pieces of boning, and hooks and eyes to close.  A couple of the pieces of boning have escaped their casings. Those that I can see are plastic. It looks as if there was a silk strip along the very bottom of the bodice, which has shattered and disintegrated over the years. The front of the bodice is ‘pouched’ in front; the lace is quite loose.

The skirt is made with a heavy pale gold satin to match the bodice. There are hooks to attach to the bottom of the bodice, and there is a pocket on the inside. There are 2 rows of double ruffles to the skirt and hem. The skirt is quite dirty- at the hem and elsewhere there is some staining. There is a mixture of machine and hand sewing, with not many alterations that I can see- although the armholes look as though they have been altered.

Measurements:-
The waist is a tiny 20″, and I guess the bust to be about 28″

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1880s 1890s Wool Capelet
1880s 1890s Wool Capelet

Late Victorian 1880s 1890s Wool Capelet

This pale yellow capelet or small cape would have looked wonderful in its day. It is made with a twilled wool, and is lined in a pale yellow cotton. At either end of the lining, pale yellow silk has been attached on top- near the front where the ties are. Some of this has shattered towards the hem of the cape, and you can see the twill fabric beneath it.  It is decorated with what looks like a wool soutache trim, and edged in a beige linen lace trim (I think it is Maltese lace). There are silk ties at the front to tie around the neck.



Measurements:-
Width of Lace~  2” (5 cm)
From inside neck to hem of lace at the front~ 12” (30.5 cm)


1820s Collar
1820s Collar
1820s (2)
c.1825 Collarette

1820s Collarette

This is a post Regency ‘vandyked’ collar, with a layer of embroidered cotton net, then a muslin layer of beautifully sewn Ayrshire whitework, and finally hand stitched muslin, made to look like the tufted muslin fabrics of the era.

The needlework, shape, and size of the collar point to around the middle of the 1820s.  The width shows that it is wide enough for the middle years, but would look out of place on the large gigot sleeves of the late 1820s and up until c.1835. The ‘vandyked’ or ‘pointy shape’ on the bottom of the net was a feature seen in the early 1800s and beyond into the 1820s, when fabric and accessories often had this shape- be it trim on a dress or detail on a sleeve. In my ‘Ackermann’s Costume Plates Women’s Fashions in England, 1818-28′, there are a fair few collars, or ‘collarettes’, where the edges are formed into  a vandyke point, and these matched well the high necked day dresses of the era. This style of collar features heavily in fashion during the years 1824-8.

Construction:
This collar is entirely hand sewn, an extremely fine example of high quality needlework. The collar on which the layers are mounted is 1/2″ in width. The edges of all the layers are hand sewn creating the scalloped shape. It fastens at the front with 2 tiny (2/8″) pearl buttons, and hand-sewn loops. Measurements: *Inside neck~ 16″ *From middle of the collar to bottom of the vandyke~ 11″

1850s Antique Victorian Cambric Chemisette or Tucker with Ayrshire Whitework
1850s Antique Victorian Cambric Chemisette or Tucker with Ayrshire Whitework

1850s Tucker or Chemisette

There is an almost identical 1850s chemisette on page 174 of Nancy Bradfield’s ‘Costume in Detail’. The workmanship is breathtaking, with exquisite Ayrshire whitework. There is what looks like  a button hole on the right hand side near the neckline at the top. It is most likely that this chemisette closed with a tiny pearl button, but there is no such button attached, sadly.

Construction:
All is beautifully hand sewn, of course. The drawnwork fillings are incredible, it is beyond me how anyone was able to sew such minute stitches. The fabric is a very fine linen- cambric. There is whitework around the collar, and then all down one side of the front opening.

1850s Restored Antique Victorian Lawn False Sleeves with Whitework
1850s Restored Antique Victorian Lawn False Sleeves with Whitework

1850s False Sleeves

This pair of false sleeves, or engageantes, are a fine example from the 1850s. I was so delighted to come across them, as there is an almost identical pair in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.  These sleeves are lovely and wide, having been used with the wide sleeved fashions of the day, such as the pagoda sleeves. A lady would have tacked them to the inside lining of her bodice sleeves.

They are made from white cotton lawn, and are beautifully hand sewn and hand embroidered with broderie anglaise (whitework embroidery.) A small pearl button does them up at the wrist, and they are not seamed.

Late Victorian Restored Antique Cap of Brussels Applique Net Lace
Late Victorian Cap of Brussels Applique Net Lace

Late Victorian Lace Cap

This cap is made with machined net and bobbin lace applique. This makes it a Brussels lace, and I would date it towards the end of the 20th century.

Construction:
The cap has been hand sewn. It has a bottom layer of machined net, under the top lace layer. There are raw edges of net in the underneath, where the trim has been added to the net, so all around the edges, but of course this can’t be seen. The bobbin lace has gorgeous fillings in the large flower heads.

Measurements:
Around the outside of the rim of the cap~ 18” or 46cm
Width of rim~ 2 1/2″ or 6.5cm
Circumference (taken above the rim)~ 25″ or 63.5cm

1910s Bust Bodice or Brassiere
1910s Bust Bodice or Brassiere

1910s Bust Bodice

This cream (I know it looks white in the photo) bust bodice had the remnants of silk straps, but they had sadly been cut off at some time.
The main lace is machine made Torchon style lace, and the fabric inserts along the bust line are cotton.  At the centre front is a tape tie with the hook to attach to the corset, and it reads ”STYLE 2260 SIZE 38”.  The lace and fabric panels are sewn together by machine.  Looking at the triangular stitching (the zig zag stitch machine was the early form of overlock stitch, or serging, invented in the 1870s), this was made in a factory, and not in someone’s home. At the back there is flat metal boning down one side where the eyes are, but none on the other side where the hooks are. The hooks and eyes are not sewn on, but have been punched in by machine.

Measurements:
This fits me comfortably, and I have a 34″ bust.
Flat along the bottom~ 29″
From tip of lace to bottom at the highest point of lace~ 10″

Dated 1879 Victorian Corset Cover for  Teenager
Dated 1879 Victorian Corset Cover

1879 Corset Cover

This tiny corset cover is almost entirely machine made. There is hand sewing in some areas, and there are raw edges where the sleeves are sewn into the bodice, which have been whip stitched over. At the front there are 6 linen buttons (2 are of a slightly different colour as they had to be replaced). At the sleeve seams, hem and neckline there is piping, and at the neckline and sleeve ends there is some unusual form of decoration, it almost looks like rick rack. There is a drawstring at the neckline, so it can be pulled in to fit if needed.

Measurements:
The size is suitable for a young/teenage girl, or a very petite lady.
Bust is maximum 27″ (69cm)
Waist maximum 24″ (61cm)
From shoulder to hem~15 1/2″ (40cm)
Sleeve circumference at bottom~ 11″ (28cm)
Circumference at sleeve end~ 9″ (23cm)

Early 1900s Edwardian Embroidered Corset Cover or Camisole - The 'S' Bend Look
Early 1900s Edwardian Embroidered Corset Cover or Camisole 

c.1900 Corset Cover

At the turn of the 20th century, women’s silhouette had turned into an ‘S’ bend shape. With the long corsets now being worn, bottoms were pushed out, as was the bosom. But a strange shaped bosom began to appear- it was moulded into the shape of a ‘mono bosom’, with underpinnings such as boned corset covers and things known as ‘bust improvers’.  This is so obviously from that period. The gathering at the centre front forms an empty space. This was where the boned bust improver or bust bodice would be.

This white cotton camisole is machine stitched and is well made. It has lovely machine embroidered flower motifs at the centre front and back, and there is an embroidered scalloped edge. It fastens with 4 mother of pearl buttons down the front, and there are embroidered initials of ‘EH’ along the front of the waistband. The fabric is very sturdy, and it has clearly not been worn much. There is a cotton tape drawstring threaded through the eyelets at the front of the bodice only, which ties on the inside.

Measurements:
Bust~ max 37″ (94cm)
Waist~ max 28″ (71cm)
From Shoulder to Hem~ 15 6/8” (40cm)

Dated 1881 Restored Antique Victorian Chemise
Dated 1881 Victorian Chemise

1881 Chemise/Shift

This chemise has a ‘bateau’ neckline, so it curves fairly high across the collar bone area and shoulders. It’s style is quite fitted, as the bulk under dresses of the time were lessened. It is dated 1881, and has ‘MG Smith’ marked above that date.

It is entirely hand sewn, with beautiful white work and feather stitch embroidery decoration around the neckline and sleeves. It has been cut from 2 pieces- a front and a back, so there are no shoulder seams. Across the front are small vertical tucks, amidst the white work. It fastens with a placket at the front, and there is one linen button at the top.

Measurements:
From shoulder to hem~ 38″
Circumference at hem~ 78″
Bust~ up to 34″
Circumference of sleeve~ 12″

1840s Tucker/Chemistte with Whitework
1840s Tucker/Chemistte with Whitework

1840s Chemisette/Tucker with Whitework

This ivory chemisette is beautifully hand sewn, and the embroidered whitework of trailing ferns around the neckline and all down the two front panels is simply stunning. The two front edges of the front panels do have a slightly different motif to one another, which is interesting. There is no button to fasten it at the top, so I would think that it would have been worn with quite a high neckline, and simply one edge folded over the other, which would explain why one side is less ornately embroidered than the other. Measurements:- From one end of shoulder to the other~ 19″ (49cm)
Length from top of shoulder to hem~ 16″ (41cm)

1910s Linen Filet Lace Collar with Fuschias and Strawberries
1910s Linen Filet Lace Collar with Fuschias and Strawberries

1910s Restored Linen Filet Lace Collar with Fuschias and Strawberries

Filet lace is a linen lace made with a knotted mesh on which the pattern is worked. This lovely collar has a motif of fuchsia flower heads and (I think) strawberries. It would be attached to the back of a dress, as was fashionable in the 1910s. Measurements:
The inner length~ 13″ (33cm)
The outer length~ 16″ (41cm)
Width of the collar at the sides~ 5″ (13cm). At the middle~ 2″ (5cm)

1840s Antique Victorian Lace Collar with Point Bobbin Lace
1840s Antique Victorian Lace Collar with Point Bobbin Lace

1840s Victorian Lace Collar with Point Bobbin Lace

This beautiful narrow collar would have been worn with the high necked day gowns of the 1840s.
It has a middle section of whiteworked muslin and is bordered with wide point bobbin lace- Lille or Buckinghamshire possibly. It is off-white or cream in colour.

Measurements:-
Length from tip to tip- 22” or 56cm
Width- nearly 4” or 10cm

1890s early 1900s  Victorian Edwardian Nightgown with Whitework and Pink Silk Ribbon
1890s early 1900s Victorian Edwardian Nightgown with Whitework and Pink Silk Ribbon

1890s early 1900s Victorian Edwardian Nightgown with Whitework and Pink Silk Ribbon

This white lightweight cotton nightgown is all machine sewn, apart from the handsewn button bars. The high neck and bodice part at the front and back is all beautiful open whitework. There is the same whitework trim at the hem of the sleeves. There is pink silk ribbon at the sleeve cuffs, high waist and high collar. It fastens with 2 original linen buttons with handsewn button bars, (one is behind the centre bodice, and one in the placket below the waist ribbon).
Measurements:
Length from shoulder to hem~55″ (140cm)
Circumference at hem~ 72″ (182cm)
Bust~ max 34″ (87cm)
Circumference of sleeve cuff~ 9” (23cm)
Length of Sleeve~ 23” (58cm)

Late Victorian Early 1900s Restored Edwardian Corset Cover Camisole
Late Victorian Early 1900s Restored Edwardian Corset Cover Camisole

Late Victorian Early 1900s Restored Antique Edwardian Corset Cover Camisole

This light, fine cotton camisole or corset cover is entirely hand-sewn. It has no seams, and is made from one piece of fabric decorated with cutwork, lace insertion and embroidery. There is a blue ribbon drawstring both at the neckline and waist, and there are 3 tiny linen buttons down the front. The shoulder straps are formed of ribbon insertion (there is no ribbon here though), and along each edge there is exquisite lace, which is also to be found along the neckline, down the centre front, and at the waist.

Measurements:
Bust ~ 35″ (89cm)
Waist~ 24″( 61cm)
Length from Shoulder to Hem of Lace~ 16 1/2″ (42cm)